General Discussion

david watt

Food impact on how a secondary cancer grows and spreads

Hi,
A topic which will divide many. My oncologist for one thinks diet does not impact cancer growth but I have always disagreed.
New study by cancer research and Cambridge university based on mice and breast cancer:
www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-42976851
Some other early stage research suggesting that high-cholesterol diet may cause colon cancer:
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180125135551.htm
None of this is conclusive but represents more pieces to the cancer jigsaw puzzle that is beginning to be better understood.
Regards
David

DianeS

Hi @david watt thank you for sharing this information. I certainly do believe that certain foods can affect cancer growth/spread, but there is so much uncertainty about which foods etc that I think we have to just wait until this is confirmed. I have read different books in diet and foods to protect and heal, and I have dramatically improved my diet, even switched to organic whenever I can purchase it. I hope it’s helping me, but because I believe in what I’m doing it makes me feel in control which is something I feel is equally important as a healthy diet. One day we will have all the answers love D :x::x::x::x:

ruthy

There was a study presented as ASCO last year that found people with stage 3 colon cancer who exercised reguarly and avoided refined carbs had half the recurrence rate. And another that found people who ate 50g tree nuts per day had half the recurrence rate. And there are loads of studies linking diet to getting bowel cancer in the first place.

I think the trouble is the messages are difficult to pass on to patients under a one size fits all/ factory model of healthcare. 30% of people who die from cancer die because they cannot consume enough food to provide energy for their body to keep going. And this figure would rise if everyone diagnosed with cancer are told to eat a plant based low carb diet as many people loose weight on this type of diet (plus can be very stressful to make diet changes when on chemo, and for some it wont alter the course of their disease). I think that individuals need to look at their own situation and make their own decisions. For me, I'm not in danger of wasting away anytime soon, but get bowel blockages if im not careful around my veg and nut intake. So I weigh everything up and do the best I can- I also want to enjoy life while I can and for me that includes cake, icecream and chips every so often. Like @DianeS I like to make an effort with my diet and lifestyle as it makes me feel more in control.

Molasar

The Hippocratic Oath (or variants, modern updates eg. the Declaration of Geneva) includes certain tenets like "firstly, do no harm".
Other texts include good stuff like "let food be your medicine and medicine your food".

It must be that certain foodstuffs (particularly in excess or in an unbalanced diet) trigger incipient cancers to develop, in the same way that some other foods contain nutrients which provide protection from cancers developing.

I'm looking forward to some definite study-based information (or data, not the same thing) about what's good and what's bad in connection with different cancers.

In the mean time I subscribe to a balanced diet of unbalanced meals, meat on rare occasions, carbs for energy, but mainly vegetables/fruits, whole cereals and stuff like tree nuts, dried fruit, and fish.
I also share the Japanese regard of dairy products as utterly unnatural for human consumption and apart from a bit of extra mature cheddar as an occasional treat I consume zero dairy or margarine (mainly because the taste makes me heave!).
The Japanese do not consume dairy and their levels of western cancers (eg. my bowel cancer) on a traditional diet are low enough to be interesting.

david watt

@Molasar if you read my post you would see that BBC article was linked at the top?

Mags54

About 22 years ago I joined Slimming World and went on to lose two and a half stones. It was in the time of the red and green days and it was acknowledged at class that following the red diet resulted in a better weight loss. So I followed the red diet religiously. It consisted, then, of loads of processed stuff like Campbell's meatbslls, corned beef and those horrible tinned burgers in gravy. It's all changed now and is very healthy but then, well, I can remember not going to the toilet properly in what felt like more than a week at a time.
I often wonder if this was a factor, or even the absolute cause of my cancer.
Love to you all :x::x::x::x:

david watt

@Mags54 think that sounds quite bad, as far as diet goes. Lots of people always go on about being regular and going toilet everyday, I was never really regular and had a poor diet lots of processed foods and not enough fruit, veg and fiber. My take on it is if you have lots of processed meats with chemicals sitting in your gut for a few days at a time, this will have an impact on the lining of your guts. No one really knows for certain what causes colon cancer, but lots of recent studies seem to point to the bacteria inside your gut and that is impacted by what foods you eat.
www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180201173406.htm

Gary not Gavin

I try to eat healthy but there are times i crave for the un healthy stuff and i have.
Whilst in hopsital i was fed sausage, ice cream, ham white bread cheese etc etc .
Cancer research has been arround for years and has had billions of pounds and will have many more billions and still no cure but the wording of the news said
In the future, scientists hope to take advantage,
if there is a cure dont you think they would have found, i think the way forward is live life to the full and always be hopeful for the future.

Only my opinion of course
Gavin :x:

jeangenie

If you have a PET scan glucose (with a radioactive marker) is injected into a vein and, when it has time to get round the body, the scanner can pick up accumulations of glucose and this may be where there is a tumour. It can also indicate inflammation. Surely this shows that cancer has a greater need for glucose than ordinary cells so a low sugar diet may well help. It has to be noted that starchy foods are digested into glucose so should be avoided on a low sugar diet as well as obvious sugar.