Decembeard

Life beyond bowel cancer

cdnico

Add aspirin trial

Just been to my clinic appt yesterday ready for my 8th and hopefully last chemo session.

The consultant has mentioned a trial they are going to start which adds a daily aspirin tablet for 5 years which could either delay or help stop cancer returning.

Anyone else heard of this or been offered it?

Regards
Chris

Polly 1

Yes thank you @Bear G got the latest CT results last Friday and no changes - he's still got a couple of tiny indeterminate lung spots but nothing showing anywhere else atm. Having a cycle off then continuing with the fortnightly Cetuximab/5FU.

Jomo9

Believe that the Add-Aspirin dosages are 100, 300 or 600mg which get revealed at some point during the trial!

Bear G

That sounds really positive @Polly 1 :x::x:

greyhound gal

Hi @Jomo9, I think those doses of aspirin are for the Lynch Syndrome capp3 trial?
:x::x:

Jomo9

@greyhound gal yes that’s right but I think that the trial is the same. Will ask my Surgeon/Oncologist when I next see them! :x::x:

hjb

Having had bowel and liver surgery last year and 3 months of chemo with an all clear result, I am in the run-in period for the add aspirin trial at the moment. I take the view that having more regular screenings can only be a good thing even if I do end up on the placebo. I'm also hugely appreciative of the NHS care and support at all stages over the last year or so, and it seems like something I can do to help others in the future.

bizzy bea

I had a right sided hemicolectomy in September 2017 after 2 tumours were found. I then had 3 months of chemotherapy. I have been on the add aspirin study for a year now. It is a very large study and I felt it was worthwhile
doing. It is also comforting to have the extra screening. I too was grateful for the nhs care and support hjb.

hjb

Thanks bizzy bea. Just reading elsewhere on the forum about the problems with travel insurance and clinical trials. We're away a lot this year (after hunkering down and cancelling plans last year) so I need to take this into account before making that final decision. Seems crazy that the travel insurance industry can't take a more sympathetic view!

cdnico

Morning all, thanks for the comments, I have signed up for the trial and start it tomorrow.

So lets see how that goes.

lindi

Hi @cdnico Dave was on the trial just after his chemo in January 2017 he had rectal cancer and liver mets both were operated on b4 chemo 6mths chemo all went to plan had extra checks due to trial then picked up his cea had risen slightly in the July that's when they told him it had reoccurred in his liver needed another liver recection asked onc about aspirin if should continue his words were well didn't work for you so no 😯

Karen17

Hi @cdnico. @lindi I'm surprised the onc didn't support continuing the trial - Dave might have been on the placebo or the lower dose of aspirin. I'm not on the trial so don't know all the facts but am interested in the final results. Best wishes to you both :x::x:

cdnico

Well I have just started the 8 weeks build upto the trial so we will see what happens

Regards
Chris

Quote from @Karen17:
Hi @cdnico. @lindi I'm surprised the onc didn't support continuing the trial - Dave might have been on the placebo or the lower dose of aspirin. I'm not on the trial so don't know all the facts but am interested in the final results. Best wishes to you both

Acre71

Im not part of the trial but i asked my surgeon if I should take daily aspirin after hearing about it. He said "it can't hurt"

soph86

hi @cdnico I am not on a trial but take a daily baby aspirin. I didn't like the size of the dosages on the trial, particularly as I don't eat as much as I used to so opted to add a baby aspirin daily instead. I am on avastin too. My oncologist is aware and happy for me to continue on this path.

SazzleJ

What is the dose of aspirin in the trial? Why would you risk having placebo when you can just buy aspirin and take it, especially if it is thought to prevent cancer returning?

cdnico

I think for me doing the trial was the peace of mind I will be getting from the 12 extra scans I will receive over the 5 year trial, and staying with the cancer hospital.

Quote from @SazzleJ:
What is the dose of aspirin in the trial? Why would you risk having placebo when you can just buy aspirin and take it, especially if it is thought to prevent cancer returning?

SazzleJ

Yes that does sound like a good incentive.
I have now been offered the option of going on this trial so I now know what the aspirin doses are. I just need to decide if it’s worth the risk of being allocated to the placebo arm.

Ruth563

Hi @cdnico my husband has been told he has lynch syndrome, we found out when they tested his bowel tumour. He is currently having number 7 of chemotherapy, and due to have 8 sessions. At his appt with the onc this week, she said because of the lynch she would recommend he takes aspirin as it has shown positive effects for people with lynch, she said with regards to tumour growth. She was suggesting the trial before we found out about the lynch, but has now said she would recommend it based on the evidence it shows with lynch syndrome. He had a single small liver met which has disappeared from scans so they couldn't operate, and they have given him more chemotherapy at the moment to really kick it's butt. I don't know if this is much help, but just some more info I guess.

Marnypots

I asked my colorectal nurse if I could be considered fir this trial and what came back was

“I have heard back from the research team and they have said that they aim to recruit patients 6-12 weeks after surgery or up to 6 weeks after chemo and therefore you do not meet the inclusion criteria. I'm sorry the trial wasn't open when you had just finished treatment. Could you discuss aspirin with your GP?”

I was a little disappointed but it’s worth anyone finishing chemo or having surgery to consider it

jj

@cdnico I just came across this post of yours and I was reading about Lynch Syndrome and here is what I read

👇🏽

Aspirin
Recent studies have shown that people with Lynch syndrome who take an aspirin a day can significantly reduce the risk of developing bowel cancer and bowel polyps. The exact dosage of aspirin required for maximum effect and the length of time it should be taken has yet to be decided. A further study called CaPP3 has started to try and determine what dose of aspirin should be taken and for how long. Further information regarding this can be found on the following website www.capp3.org.
(Burn et al 2011, Long-term effect of aspirin on cancer risk in carriers of hereditary colorectal cancer: an analysis from the CAPP2 randomised controlled trial Volume 378, No. 9809, p2081– 2087, 17 December 2011)