General discussion

Afraidboy

No chemo this week because of low bloods

Went to hospital today to have my chemo but they said my bloods were low and needs to be delayed a week. Worried now as this will be two weeks without treatment. Anyone else had similar?

Afraidboy
Quote from @Baxter2:
Hi @Afraidboy

I need to do self administered injections for seven days each 2 week cycle. They boost white cells. Is it your neutrophils that are low? If so you could ask about having them. Filgrastim or GCSF they re called. It's such a shame to have to turn up to the hospital though as this would have been known from your bloods that chemo wasn't going ahead today. Such a wasted trip and a needless risk in going into a hospital!

Sending love

Karen 💚💛💙❤️💜

Hello

They didn't mention the cause just said low bloods were just below the border lines. So I had everything connected up ready to go then she said can't be done today and will delay the treatment for a week. Can't be helped I guess but yeah they would of had my blood results on Tuesday when I done them. Hopefully one week won't cause any harm? :x:

Tiffany

@Afraidboy

Yes this happens to my husband quite often and he has chemo every three weeks now instead of every other week to give his body a chance to recover. You can try to boost your system a bit by taking either Life Mel honey (it's pretty expensive though) or Papaya Leaf Extract Capsules. Make sure you eat really healthily if you can - Lots of leafy greens and super foods. However, waiting the extra week won't make any difference to your treatment regime so try not to worry too much. Tiffany :x:

Afraidboy

Thank you all so much as always :x: :x:

Afraidboy

I try and get honey to see if that helps :) :x:

ClareJ

Hi, we had exactly the same problem and Andy started LifeMel honey last week as his neutrophils had dropped again and this week they've gone from 1.2 to 2.2 so a massive rise in a week! We have found the honey on Amazon and if you buy 10 jars at a time it becomes only £7.60 per jar!! @Tiffany - you might be interested, I'll send you the link!

Afraidboy

Thank you so much I get some :x:

kathyS

@Afraidboy I had this experience twice and I was hooked up and ready to go one of the times, it’s so disappointing! You just worry about the wait and whether your bloods will be better the next time. My Dr adjusted the dose for me of the chemo which meant it didn’t wipe me out so much. This meant the next time my bloods were OK. Kxx

Afraidboy

Thank you so much yeah it's a worry isn't it but what can we do? Well hopefully next week things get going again :x: :x:

ClareJ

@Afraidboy - my apologies, ignore my message about the honey as I have been massively mislead. The advert said 10 x120g but when it was dispatched last night it says 1x120g 😳 so I contacted the seller and they said - we take one pot out of the packet!!! I’m trying to get a refund but they’ve now changed their advert so I have no proof 😠 Sorry!

Afraidboy
Quote from @ClareJ:
@Afraidboy - my apologies, ignore my message about the honey as I have been massively mislead. The advert said 10 x120g but when it was dispatched last night it says 1x120g 😳 so I contacted the seller and they said - we take one pot out of the packet!!! I’m trying to get a refund but they’ve now changed their advert so I have no proof 😠 Sorry!

Thank you it's alright. It's nice that you told me about the honey. I got confirmation today my next chemo is next Thursday now :x:

Mrs Red Shoes

Hello @Afraidboy and @Baxter2 Apologies for coming so late to this conversation but I just wanted to say I was once ‘phoned by my hospital to warn me my counts were low but was told to come in the next day anyway because there was a possibility the figures would go up overnight. I must admit I had little expectation but lo and behold, my neutrophils went up from 0.6 to 3.7 and WBCs from 2.1 to 4.9. I should add that I was only on Capecitabine then and since they’ve added Oxaliplatin to my cocktail, I’ve been three weeks running without making the grade. Thankfully that ended this week (even then they went up 3 points in 48 hours) and they have now reduced the strength of the infusion and changed the days of the injections from 3-7 to 10 to 14. Since according to a notice outside the chemo ward, this period coincides with your lowest readings, this is either eminently sensible or a slight piece of manipulation, but if it works, that’s all that matters. Incidentally, I was told the injections were given as routine now only because of the added threat of Covid-19. Another puzzle as told to me by @Polly2 (and I hope I understood her correctly) was that several years ago when her husband’s counts were low, they made him wait a week but then resumed chemo the following week without re-testing. That’s medical science for you. Hugs to you both. Jan

Afraidboy
Quote from @Mrs Red Shoes:
Hello @Afraidboy and @Baxter2 Apologies for coming so late to this conversation but I just wanted to say I was once ‘phoned by my hospital to warn me my counts were low but was told to come in the next day anyway because there was a possibility the figures would go up overnight. I must admit I had little expectation but lo and behold, my neutrophils went up from 0.6 to 3.7 and WBCs from 2.1 to 4.9. I should add that I was only on Capecitabine then and since they’ve added Oxaliplatin to my cocktail, I’ve been three weeks running without making the grade. Thankfully that ended this week (even then they went up 3 points in 48 hours) and they have now reduced the strength of the infusion and changed the days of the injections from 3-7 to 10 to 14. Since according to a notice outside the chemo ward, this period coincides with your lowest readings, this is either eminently sensible or a slight piece of manipulation, but if it works, that’s all that matters. Incidentally, I was told the injections were given as routine now only because of the added threat of Covid-19. Another puzzle as told to me by @Polly2 (and I hope I understood her correctly) was that several years ago when her husband’s counts were low, they made him wait a week but then resumed chemo the following week without re-testing. That’s medical science for you. Hugs to you both. Jan

Hello

Thanks for your kind words. Yeah I had to wait another week for my chemo to restart again. The good news my bloods were back to normal when I had chemo again. X.

GD62

Two weeks is nothing @Afraidboy as chemo cooks those badgers for 6 to 8 weeks. Have had same issues too, you'll be good.

Hugs :x::x::x:

Mrs Red Shoes

I recall you were going through a tough time when I first joined this forum, trying to get news of when your treatment was going to start. I hope things are going well for you now, despite the blood count problem. Did I see you live in Tonbridge? If so, are you under Maidstone hospital? I lived in Tunbridge Wells until last September and have had my own experiences of Maidstone hospital! Jan :x:

Afraidboy
Quote from @Mrs Red Shoes:
I recall you were going through a tough time when I first joined this forum, trying to get news of when your treatment was going to start. I hope things are going well for you now, despite the blood count problem. Did I see you live in Tonbridge? If so, are you under Maidstone hospital? I lived in Tunbridge Wells until last September and have had my own experiences of Maidstone hospital! Jan

Hello, Yeah I live in Tonbridge and was going fine in 2017 after my first treatment started but the thing came back in my liver this year, I'm hoping the treatment again this year will kill it off but it never stops does it? I do go to maidstone hospital I practically live there :) How things with you? Y

Mrs Red Shoes

Things with me are ok thank you. Like everybody else, I’m just wishing this damned virus would go away to get a bit of normality back into life. I started this particular cancer episode last Spring when they discovered that a polyp first thought to be benign had a few cancer cells but because it was removed piecemeal, they weren’t sure whether the cancer had actually invaded the bowel wall. My now hospital think that Maidstone were negligent in their follow up and because of that plus changing nhs trusts when we moved to Shropshire, I ended up stage 4 at my first consultation here. I’m currently on chemo because the bowel op planned for 2 April was cancelled due to Covid. I have just had another liver MRI at the request of Birmingham (specialist) hospital and a CT scan to check the impact of the chemo. I was due to speak to my surgeon on 7 July but got a call this morning to say he wants to see me. That got me worrying until my husband pointed out I hadn’t actually seen the surgeon since 30 March; also that my face to face appointment with the oncologist due tomorrow has been switched to a ‘phone call. So I can only wait. At the same time, I am leaving no stone unturned in terms of treatment and hopefully keeping the beast at bay. I have a nutritionist friend who has beaten cancer twice - the second time without conventional treatment; her oncologist at Kings College calls her the lady who cured herself -helping me with diet. I’m also reading up on the Jane McClelland protocol and have registered with the Care Oncology Clinic in London. The COC seem to get some good results judging from posts on here. Glad you’re blood count recovered as soon as it did and hope the chemo is not treating you too unkindly. Everything I see on this forum and elsewhere suggests that for more people than we realise, it does stop so just hang on in there. I have three friends in TW whom were all given months to live at some stage and all of whom are still alive years later, the longest 10 years. There are great things happening out there! Jan Quote from @Afraidboy:
Hello, Yeah I live in Tonbridge and was going fine in 2017 after my first treatment started but the thing came back in my liver this year, I'm hoping the treatment again this year will kill it off but it never stops does it? I do go to maidstone hospital I practically live there How things with you? Y[/quote]

Afraidboy
Quote from @Mrs Red Shoes:
Things with me are ok thank you. Like everybody else, I’m just wishing this damned virus would go away to get a bit of normality back into life. I started this particular cancer episode last Spring when they discovered that a polyp first thought to be benign had a few cancer cells but because it was removed piecemeal, they weren’t sure whether the cancer had actually invaded the bowel wall. My now hospital think that Maidstone were negligent in their follow up and because of that plus changing nhs trusts when we moved to Shropshire, I ended up stage 4 at my first consultation here. I’m currently on chemo because the bowel op planned for 2 April was cancelled due to Covid. I have just had another liver MRI at the request of Birmingham (specialist) hospital and a CT scan to check the impact of the chemo. I was due to speak to my surgeon on 7 July but got a call this morning to say he wants to see me. That got me worrying until my husband pointed out I hadn’t actually seen the surgeon since 30 March; also that my face to face appointment with the oncologist due tomorrow has been switched to a ‘phone call. So I can only wait. At the same time, I am leaving no stone unturned in terms of treatment and hopefully keeping the beast at bay. I have a nutritionist friend who has beaten cancer twice - the second time without conventional treatment; her oncologist at Kings College calls her the lady who cured herself -helping me with diet. I’m also reading up on the Jane McClelland protocol and have registered with the Care Oncology Clinic in London. The COC seem to get some good results judging from posts on here. Glad you’re blood count recovered as soon as it did and hope the chemo is not treating you too unkindly. Everything I see on this forum and elsewhere suggests that for more people than we realise, it does stop so just hang on in there. I have three friends in TW whom were all given months to live at some stage and all of whom are still alive years later, the longest 10 years. There are great things happening out there! Jan Quote from @Afraidboy:
Hello, Yeah I live in Tonbridge and was going fine in 2017 after my first treatment started but the thing came back in my liver this year, I'm hoping the treatment again this year will kill it off but it never stops does it? I do go to maidstone hospital I practically live there How things with you? Y

[/quote]

Hello,

I really enjoyed reading your comments and totally agree if you have been waiting since March to see your oncologist, sometimes best just to get it out of the way and yeah we need to beat this cancer beast. Everywhere I go now I hear people are saying "I got cancer or she has or he has", It's getting too much to handle but now I just try and block off to try and focus on it. I had a neighbour that has just recently died and she has had cancer a few times. ( I just keep thinking that it's going to come back again and again and can't get it out of my head) I refused counselling as I didn't think this was helping one bit, especially over a telephone call and not face2face! Well when I spoke to my oncologist yesterday that said my liver tumours have slightly reduced but I not sure how big these tumours are really are as they never show you? Last year I had a clear scan after having cancer back in 2017 and didn't really think that it would come back but it did - Grr. Can I ask how long you have had cancer? Do you think the chemo makes us more worse even with having scans etc...:x:

Mrs Red Shoes

Of course you can ask. I had early stage breast cancer in 2018 but that’s easily treatable nowadays and the prognosis is very good. I was clear at my last check in Feb this year and anyway, that’s not connected to the bowel cancer. They found a polyp in my bowel in March 2019 but it was only when I had a colonoscopy to remove it that they found it had malignant cells. They followed me up every three months at Maidstone till August but they couldn’t do the MRIs I was supposed to have because the metal clip in my bowel, marking where the polyp had been, made the MRI unreadable. We moved to Shropshire in September and I tried to get myself referred in time for my next three month check but that was a nightmare and I didn’t get seen until February, by which time the polyp was back with three small bits in my liver. The chances are that I had something remaining even though the sigmoidoscopies I had at Maidstone were clear. I totally agree there is cancer everywhere. It’s going to affect one in two people nowadays (an advert for cancer research saying just that came up on the tv as I type!) which is horrible but also I think means the search for a cure will be speeded up - there may well be something just round the corner-and it’s no longer so difficult to talk about it, which is good. I definitely wouldn’t do without chemo though I’m not sure they should blast you with full strength at the very start! It’s definitely a life saver though I choose to combine it with other things intended to make my body inhospitable to cancer. That’s the hope anyway. My consultant at the Care Oncology Clinic said cancer is nowadays becoming a chronic disease in that people who may not have survived in the past, will now live with it for many, many years. That does not mean cures won’t happen and I sincerely hope you and I are in this category. As to your scans, you should ask for copies of the reports which will show you how big the mets are and where they are situated. You are entitled to see these. As I understand it, they can ablate mets under 3cm but there is also the question of where they are in relation to large blood vessels. There is a liver metastasis booklet (currently being reviewed) on the BCUK website. I found it very good in explaining things. Lots of charts etc. Doctors are sometimes reluctant to do this because they are short of time and probably think (wrongly) you wouldn’t understand if they did. I am probably old enough to be your mother but I’ve always lived life to the full and thought I’d inherited my mother and grandmother’s genes- they both lived to be over 90. I get the impression you have a young family, which must make things doubly difficult but there are so many great stories on the forum, I do hope you can get encouragement from them. When I get low, I read some of them and convince myself if they can do it, I can. Stay positive! Someone who had worked at my cancer centre in TW for 15 years was absolutely convinced that positivity made a world of difference. Hopes this doesn’t come across as patronising. Jan

Afraidboy
Quote from @Mrs Red Shoes:
Of course you can ask. I had early stage breast cancer in 2018 but that’s easily treatable nowadays and the prognosis is very good. I was clear at my last check in Feb this year and anyway, that’s not connected to the bowel cancer. They found a polyp in my bowel in March 2019 but it was only when I had a colonoscopy to remove it that they found it had malignant cells. They followed me up every three months at Maidstone till August but they couldn’t do the MRIs I was supposed to have because the metal clip in my bowel, marking where the polyp had been, made the MRI unreadable. We moved to Shropshire in September and I tried to get myself referred in time for my next three month check but that was a nightmare and I didn’t get seen until February, by which time the polyp was back with three small bits in my liver. The chances are that I had something remaining even though the sigmoidoscopies I had at Maidstone were clear. I totally agree there is cancer everywhere. It’s going to affect one in two people nowadays (an advert for cancer research saying just that came up on the tv as I type!) which is horrible but also I think means the search for a cure will be speeded up - there may well be something just round the corner-and it’s no longer so difficult to talk about it, which is good. I definitely wouldn’t do without chemo though I’m not sure they should blast you with full strength at the very start! It’s definitely a life saver though I choose to combine it with other things intended to make my body inhospitable to cancer. That’s the hope anyway. My consultant at the Care Oncology Clinic said cancer is nowadays becoming a chronic disease in that people who may not have survived in the past, will now live with it for many, many years. That does not mean cures won’t happen and I sincerely hope you and I are in this category. As to your scans, you should ask for copies of the reports which will show you how big the mets are and where they are situated. You are entitled to see these. As I understand it, they can ablate mets under 3cm but there is also the question of where they are in relation to large blood vessels. There is a liver metastasis booklet (currently being reviewed) on the BCUK website. I found it very good in explaining things. Lots of charts etc. Doctors are sometimes reluctant to do this because they are short of time and probably think (wrongly) you wouldn’t understand if they did. I am probably old enough to be your mother but I’ve always lived life to the full and thought I’d inherited my mother and grandmother’s genes- they both lived to be over 90. I get the impression you have a young family, which must make things doubly difficult but there are so many great stories on the forum, I do hope you can get encouragement from them. When I get low, I read some of them and convince myself if they can do it, I can. Stay positive! Someone who had worked at my cancer centre in TW for 15 years was absolutely convinced that positivity made a world of difference. Hopes this doesn’t come across as patronising. Jan

Thank you so much such a good comment to read. I feel stronger even by reading it now :) Yeah I am young and have kids so I'm gonna try and beat this thing out of my system. Just sitting at the chemo hospital now so that's gonna be a long day :x:

Mrs Red Shoes

That’s the attitude. Hesitate to give advice cos everybody’s different but I’m useless when I feel powerless and just having things done to me. If you are the same, it may help to find something you can do to help make sure the cancer goes away and never comes back. Exercise, diet etc. Lots of attention nowadays on how cancer feeds itself and how to stop it getting access to its fuel supplies. I’m probably telling you something you know already! J